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February 15, 2019

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  • Health o meter Professional Scales celebrates 100 Year Anniversary and weigheasier Culture with company video
  • From the Publisher

  • New episode of Road Warriors and Their Untold Stories - featuring Eddie Dienes!
  • Manufacturer News

  • Fortune Magazine names Stryker one of the 100 Best Companies to Work For in 9th consecutive year
  • Tips for Greater Success

  • Train Your Brain to Focus
  • Hospital and IDN News

  • Baylor Scott & White's net income falls 55%
  • Cheyenne Regional Health System names CEO
  • Healthcare IT News

  • Mayo Clinic debuts first-aid voice skill for Google Assistant
  • News of the Weird

  • Director of nursing skis to cancer hospital after Utah snowstorm
  • New Tinder-like app helps farmers match livestock for love
  • Sponsored
    Health o meter Professional Scales celebrates 100 Year Anniversary and weigheasier Culture with company video
    Health o meter Professional Scales announces a new company video in celebration of the Health o meter Professional brand’s 100 year anniversary and the company’s weigheasier culture. This new video highlights the company’s unique strengths and its weigheasier business philosophy. Viewers will get a behind-the-scenes look at the Illinois based headquarters and get to know the Health o meter Professional Scales family that provides the company’s industry leading products and support.
    Click here to view the new video!
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    From the Publisher
    New episode of Road Warriors and Their Untold Stories - featuring Eddie Dienes!
    The second episode of the Road Warriors podcast is now available! This week’s guest is Eddie Dienes of McKesson. Eddie tells some great stories in this new episode - talking about everything from John Sasen putting a lobster to sleep at a restaurant to one of his delivery drivers running his van through a 7-11. And, as always, there are more than a couple pearls of sales wisdom delivered.

    Click here to enjoy this new episode!

    Stay tuned! Episode 3 featuring Brad Connett of Henry Schein will air February 27!

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    Manufacturer News
    Fortune Magazine names Stryker one of the 100 Best Companies to Work For in 9th consecutive year
    Stryker (Kalamazoo, MI) announced today was named one of Fortune’s 2019 100 Best Companies to Work For in its annual survey and evaluation of top-rated workplaces in the United States. The list recognizes companies that have exceptional workplace cultures. This is the ninth consecutive year Stryker has been named to the list, and the company was ranked #11.
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    Tips for Greater Success
    Train Your Brain to Focus

    In this week’s Tips for Greater Success, Dan Nielsen, founder of AmericasHealthcareLeaders.com and NIHCL.com, writes,

    "I have a question for you. Do you feel more productive and accomplished when youve stayed busy all daychecking things of your list, making phone calls, answering texts, sending emails, attending meetings, running errands, etc.or when youve hunkered down, focused, and made significant progress on one particular problem or project?
    "Theres no right or wrong answer. Some people seem to thrive on busy, exulting in accomplishing as many different tasks in a day as possible, and relishing checking it all off their list at the end of the day. Other people much rather spend hours on end focused on a singular task, finding..." (continue reading)
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    Hospital and IDN News
    Baylor Scott & White's net income falls 55%
    Baylor Scott & White Health (Dallas, TX) saw revenue increase in the first half of fiscal year 2019, but losses on investments dragged down its bottom line. The system reported operating revenue of $4.9 billion in the six months ended December 31, up 2% from $4.8 billion in the same period a year prior. At the same time, salaries, wages and supply costs increased the health system's expenses. Baylor Scott & White recorded total operating expenses of $4.5 billion in the first half of fiscal 2019, up 1.4% year over year from $4.4 billion. Baylor Scott & White did see an increase in operating income in the first half of fiscal 2019. The system reported operating income of $415.8 million, up 8.4% from the same period in fiscal year 2018. However, nonoperating losses pulled down the health system's bottom line. Baylor Scott & White recorded a $186.8 million loss on investments for the first six months of fiscal 2019, compared to a $111.8 million gain on investments during the same period in fiscal 2018. After including nonoperating results, Baylor Scott & White ended the first half of fiscal 2019 with net income of $267.7 million, down 55% from $595.5 million reported at the same time a year prior.
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    Cheyenne Regional Health System names CEO
    Cheyenne Regional Health System (Cheyenne, WY) named Timothy Thornell as CEO effective April 8. He is currently the CEO of Lea Regional Medical Center and Lea Regional Medical Group (Hobbs, NM). Thornell succeeds Patrick Madigan, who will stay on during the transition.
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    Healthcare IT News
    Mayo Clinic debuts first-aid voice skill for Google Assistant
    Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN) released Mayo First Aid, a first aid tool for Google's voice assistant. Mayo First Aid can give advice on how to treat various conditions, such as fevers, spider bites or cuts. It also provides information on how to respond in select emergency, such as how to preform CPR. Mayo Clinic initially launched the too on Amazon's Alexa voice assistant in late 2017. Now, users of Google Assistant-enabled devices will be able to access the voice application. Mayo Clinic also recently launched a web-based version of the voice application on the health system's website, where users can access the tool without Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant.
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    News of the Weird
    Director of nursing skis to cancer hospital after Utah snowstorm
    The director of nursing at the Huntsman Cancer Institute in Utah went to extreme lengths to avoid missing work because of the snow. Sue Childress realized early Wednesday morning that her commute to the work would be a challenge.
    “I came out about 6:30 thinking I could drive and it was already covered in snow,” Childress said. “At that point, I said to myself, ‘Okay, the bus isn’t going to come up here.’”
    But she was not deterred. “I always thought about skiing into work and so, I just said, this is the day to do it,” Childress said. She strapped on her skis and before sunrise, she made the two-mile trek to the hospital. As a nurse, with patients depending on her for care, Childress felt it was her duty.
    “This hospital runs 24/7,” Childress said. “I wanted to get in, in time to make sure my nurses were doing okay.” Sue’s coworkers were not shocked by her dedication.
    “One of them said, ‘Well, Sue’s here. She already skied in, so you better not ask if you should come in or not,’” Childress recalled. Sue said she enjoyed the whole experience and she may have found a method of transportation that keeps her from having to dig her car out of the snow in the future. “It was a fun morning,” Childress said. “I got to say hello to a lot of people shoveling. So yea, I would do it again, for sure.
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    New Tinder-like app helps farmers match livestock for love
    A Tinder-inspired app is helping farmers match up potential partners for their cattle. The Tudder app lets farmers swipe right on cattle they like the look of. They are then directed to a page on the SellMyLivestock website where they can browse more pictures and data about the animals before deciding whether to buy. Valuable information is available on matters like milk yield and protein content, or calving potential, explained Doug Bairner, CEO of Hectare Agritech which runs SellMyLivestock (SML) and Graindex, a UK-based online agritech trading platform.
    Matching livestock online is even easier than it is to match humans because theres a huge amount of data that sits behind these wonderful animals that predicts what their offspring will be, he said.
    Launched just in time for Valentines Day, the makers believe Tudder is the first ever matchmaking app for livestock.
    As with the human equivalent, farmers use smartphones to first choose whether they are looking for a male or female, swiping through photos - right for yes and left for no - until they find a match. Putting data at their fingertips connects farmers from all over the country, making trading easier.
    Cattle farmer and Tudder user James Bridger said it eases transport stress for animals and may rival traditional markets. Theres nothing better than seeing an animal in its home, its natural habitat, rather than putting it on a [truck] ... if someone rings up and wants to come and have a look, or even getting it from the picture, its ideal really from that respect, and theyre happier for it.
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